Year 9, 10 and 11

Dance

Subject

Dance

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board

AQA

Course Leader

Mrs Georgina Wright

Course summary

GCSE Dance is a fresh and vibrant subject which includes popular performance and choreography, alongside the study of diverse and accessible professional works. Its aim is to give students the opportunity not only to learn set dances but choreograph their own work and learn about current and influential dance works.

What will students learn?

Year 9

An introduction to the course where by students begin to learn the requirements of a dance practice as well as begin to study the six set professional works.

These are studied both and through appreciation lessons.

Year 10

This year is consolidation of year 9 and when students will begin to undertake the practical coursework requirements of the course.

Students will complete their Performance section of Component 1 during the summer term.

 

Year 11

By the final year, students will have a well-rounded and thorough understanding of dance styles, techniques and current professional works.

They will complete the choreography element of component 1 in the Autumn term and from January focus on component 2: Dance appreciation combining study both and theatrically.

 

How will students be assessed?

Component 1: Performance and Choreography – 60%

 

Performance – 30%

  • Set phrases through a solo performance
  • Duet/trio performance

 

 

Choreography – 30%

  • Solo or group choreography – a solo or a group dance for two to five dancers
  •  
  • Component 2: Dance Appreciation – 40%
  • Written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Knowledge and understanding of choreographic processes and performing skills 
  • Critical appreciation of own work 
  • Critical appreciation of professional works

 

 

Differentiation

Students are placed into a variety of teaching groups to either stretch or enhance their ability ranges. Those with SEND needs are catered for through teacher and if needed TA support. Higher ability students are given tasks for reading around the subject and strategies that can develop their abilities within the subject

Resources

AQA Dance student work book

BBC bitesize

Drama

Subject

Drama

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board

OCR

Course Leader

Mrs Georgina Wright

Course summary

The course is designed to build on the techniques learned in years 7 and 8 and to explore the subject and theoretically. This is done through devising of original work, bringing to life published texts, developing students evaluative and reflective abilities as well as working as creative artists through exploration and rehearsal processes. Students will also be required to attend a visit to see a piece of live theatre.

 

What will students learn?

Year 9

Students begin to develop their r understanding of different theatre styles as well as theatre practitioners from Noh Theatre to the study of Brecht. This is to ensure that they have a wide range of knowledge, both and theoretically before moving into Year 10

Year 10

The start of the year is devoted to building on the practical aspect of the course through focused work on different types of stimuli and explorative strategies. The study of a published play is then practically explored as well as the study of exam style questions.

During the Summer term, students will complete their Component 1 – Devising.

 

Year 11

This Autumn term is dedicated to preparation and completion of Component 2 – Presenting and performing Texts. Students practically explore the play ‘An Inspector Calls’ as well as performing extracts to a visiting examiner.

The Spring term the course will spotlight the final aspect of the course, Component 3 – Performance and Response again, students will study the text through both practical and written exercises.

 

How will students be assessed?

  • Component 1 – Devising. Practical performance and written portfolio. Internally assessed – 30%
  • Component 2 – Presenting and performing Texts. Practical performance of an extract from a published play assessed by an external examiner – 30%
  • Component 3 – Performance and Response – Written exam. Section A – Blood Brothers, section B – Live Theatre evaluation – externally assessed – 40%

Differentiation

Students are placed into a variety of teaching groups to either stretch or enhance their ability ranges. Those with SEND needs are catered for through teacher and if needed TA support. Higher ability students are given tasks for reading around the subject and strategies that can develop their abilities within the subject

Resources

Students will need to have copies of Blood Brothers and An Inspector Calls, either purchased or borrowed from the college.

All students will be provided with booklets and resources for each component to support them throughout the course.

BBC bitesize

OCR Drama website

The Stage newspaper

French

Subject

French

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board

Edexcel

Course Leader

Mrs S. Dewey

Course summary

Students will study five themes: Identity and culture; Local area, holiday and travel; School; Future aspirations, study and work; International and global dimension. All themes and topics will be studied in the context of both the students’ home country and that of countries and communities where French is spoken. A key focus will beIdentity and Culture as this incorporates many areas that students will want to talk about and gives good opportunities to learn much of the required grammar and vocabulary. The aim is for students to produce spontaneous language applying grammar rules accurately in both speaking and writing and to understand spoken and written information across a range of themes and topics.

What will students learn?

Year 9

Studio 3 rouge;

Module 1 – Ma vie sociale d’ado. Theme: Identity and Culture. Talking about Facebook. Giving your opinion about someone. Arranging to go out. Describing a date. Describing a music event. Taking part in a ‘blind date’ speed-dating event in French. Grammar; regular –er verbs, direct object, pronouns, adjective agreement, the near future tense, the perfect tense with avoir/être, two meanings of il y a.

Module 2 – Bien dans sa peau. Theme: Identity and culture. Learning the parts of the body. Talking about sport. Learning about healthy eating. Making plans to get fit. Deciding to adopt a healthier lifestyle. Grammar; à + definite article,

the nous form of the present tense, il faut, depuis + present tense, talking about the future, negatives: ne … pas and ne … jamais, the future tense, using three tenses together

present, perfect and future tenses + il y avait, c’était, il faut.

Module 3 – A l’horizon. Theme: Future aspirations, study and work. Describing jobs. Learning languages. Saying what you used to do. Discussing your future and your past. Talking about your job. Grammar: nouns for jobs, modal verbs pouvoir, vouloir, devoir, the imperfect tense, the future tense, question forms, using different tenses together.

Module 4 – Spécial Vacances. Theme: Local area, holiday and travel. Discussing holidays. Imagining adventure holidays. Talking about what you take with you on holiday. Grammar: the pronoun y, question forms, the conditional, reflexive verbs, the perfect tense (irregular past participles & verbs taking être), emphatic pronouns, using three tenses.

Module 5 – Moi dans le monde. Theme: International and global dimension. Discussing what you are allowed to do. Explaining what’s important to you. Talking about things you buy.  Describing what makes you happy. Talking about what is important to them, what concerns them and what makes them happy. Grammar: expressions with avoir, the informal imperative, direct object pronouns (me, te, nous, vous), direct object pronouns (le/la/l’, les), si … sentences, meilleur

using different time frames, present, perfect, imperfect and future tenses, extended sentences.

Year 10

Studio GCSE Edexcel;

Module 1 – Qui suis-je? Theme: Identity and culture. Friends and family – description, relationships, discussing activities, role models. Grammar; Verb tenses - present tense - regular, irregular and reflexive verbs, near future tense, perfect tense, imperfect tense.

Module 2 – Le Temps et les loisirs. Theme: Identity and culture. Free-time activities. Grammar; depuis + present tense, comparison, imperfect tense, object pronouns (it, them)

Module 3 – Jours ordinaires, jours de fête. Theme: Identity and culture. Special occasions, festivals and celebrations. Grammar; pouvoir and devoir, questions in tu and vous form, venir de, using combination of tenses.

Module 4 – De la ville à la campagne. Theme: Local area, holidays and travel. Describing where you live, region/town/village, discuss what activities can be done there, weather. Grammar; future tense, use of present, perfect and future tense together.

Module 5 – Le grand large. Theme: Local area, holidays and travel. Holidays (present and near future) – ideal holiday, accommodation, eating out, travel, shopping for souvenirs, holiday disasters. Grammar: conditional tense, reflexive verbs in perfect tense, en + present participle, avant de + infinitive, pluperfect tense.

 

Year 11

Studio GCSE Edexcel;

Module 5 – Le grand large. Theme: Local area, holidays and travel. Holidays (past) – ideal holiday, accommodation, eating out, travel, shopping for souvenirs, holiday disasters. Grammar: conditional tense, reflexive verbs in perfect tense, en + present participle, avant de + infinitive, pluperfect tense.

Module 6 – Au college. Theme: School. Describing school – subjects, timetable, facilities, comparing UK to schools in French-speaking countries, rules, extra-curricular activities, school exchange. Grammar: pronouns il/elle, il faut / il est interdit de + infinitive, imperative / commands, using 3 time frames together.

Module 7 – Bon travail. Theme: Future aspirations, study and work. Jobs and work preferences, career choices, future plans and hopes, discuss importance of languages, job applications. Grammar: saying better or worse, recognising the subjunctive (H), verbs followed by à or de.

Module 8 – Un oeil sur le monde. Theme: International and global dimension. World issues and problems, the environment, ethical shopping, volunteer work, big events. Grammar: pouvoir and vouloir, passive voice (H).

Revision and preparation for speaking exam.

 

How will students be assessed?

Exam at end of year11.

4 skills – listening, speaking, reading and writing. Speaking assessed in April/May. Conducted by class teacher, recorded and marked by exam board. All papers marked externally. Each paper = 25%.

Differentiation

Differentiated course via textbook – higher and foundation.

Grammar content is differentiated for the two tiers.

SEN – access to KS3 textbook for revision and consolidation via online activelearn.

 

Resources

Textbook - Studio GCSE for Edexcel (Pearson) Higher / Foundation.

https://www.pearsonactivelearn.com

https://www.languagesonline.org.uk

https://www.doddlelearn.co.uk

https://www.memrise.com

https://www.duolingo.com

www.bbc.co.uk/languages

Spanish

Subject

Spanish

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board

Edexcel

Course Leader

Mrs S. Dewey

Course summary

Students will study five themes: Identity and culture; Local area, holiday and travel; School; Future aspirations, study and work; International and global dimension. All themes and topics will be studied in the context of both the students’ home country and that of countries and communities where French is spoken. A key focus will beIdentity and Culture as this incorporates many areas that students will want to talk about and gives good opportunities to learn much of the required grammar and vocabulary. The aim is for students to produce spontaneous language applying grammar rules accurately in both speaking and writing and to understand spoken and written information across a range of themes and topics.

What will students learn?

 

Year 9

Viva 3 rojo:

Module 1: Somos asi. Theme: Identity and culture.

Talking about things you like. Talking about your week. Talking about films. Talking about a birthday. Talking about life as a celebrity. Understanding descriptions of days out

Using the four Ws when listening. Grammar: Definite article with opinions. Present tense of ir, hacer, ser (full paradigm)

– pronunciation of c. Present tense of regular -ar, -er and -ir verbs (full paradigm). Near future tense. The preterite (full paradigm).

Module 2: !0riéntate! Theme: Current and future studyand employment.

Saying what you have to do at work. Saying what job you would like to do. Talking about your future. Describing your job. Checking for accuracy and looking up new words. Using reference materials. Grammar: tener que + infinitive, adjectival agreement, present tense v. near future tense, verb patterns: regular and irregular.

Module 3: En forma. Theme: Identity and culture.

Talking about diet. Talking about an active lifestyle. Talking about your daily routine. Talking about getting fit. Talking about ailments. Grammar: direct object pronouns, stem-changing verbs jugar and preferir, preterite of jugar and empezar), reflexive verbs, (no) se debe

me duele(n).

Module 4: Jovenes en acción. Theme: Local, national, international and global areas of interest.

Talking about children’s rights. Talking about fair trade. Expressing your point of view. Talking about recycling. Talking about how a town has changed. Writing about fundraising. Choosing the correct Spanish word. Grammar: poder, 3rd person present tense (singular and plural), se debería + infinitive, imperfect tense.

Module 5: Una aventura en Madrid. Theme: Local, national, international and global areas of interest.

Meeting and greeting people. Talking about a treasure hunt.

Discussing buying souvenirs. Saying what you will do. Making yourself understood. Saying the right thing in different situations. Grammar: the verb tener, the superlative, the comparative, the future tense.

Year 10

Viva GCSE Edexcel:

Module 1: !Desconéctate! Theme: Local, national, international and global areas of interest.

Saying what you do in summer. Listening to identify the person of the verb. Talking about holiday preferences. Using verbs of opinion to refer to different people. Understanding percentages. Saying what you did on holiday. Using different structures to give opinions. Describing where you stayed.

Working out the meaning of new word. Booking accommodation and dealing with problems. Using questions to form answers. Giving an account of a holiday in the past.

Identifying positive and negative opinions Grammar: Present tense of regular verbs and irregular verb ser. Using verbs of opinion: gustar, encantar, chiflar, molar, apasionar, flipar. Using connectives: dado que, puesto que, ya que. Present tense of stem changing verbs: preferir, tener and ir. Preterite tense of regular verbs and irregular verbs ser and ir. Sequencers (primero, luego, más tarde, después, finalmente) and opinion phrases  (lo mejor/peor) . Verbs in the ‘we’ form. Imperfect tense of estar, tener, ser, haber. Using ser or estar in the imperfect for descriptions in the past. Question words: Cuándo / cuánto / a qué hora. Using usted in formal situations. Using three tenses together (present, preterite, imperfect).

Module 2: Mi vida en el insti. Theme: School.

Giving opinions about school subjects. Describing school facilities. Describing school uniform and the school day. Talking about subjects and teacher. Justifying opinions using a range of language. Describing your school.

Comparing then and now. Talking about school rules and problems. Talking about plans for a school exchange. Asking and answering questions. Talking about activities and achievements. Saying how long you have been doing something. Grammar: Opinion verbs: interesar, odiar, preferir. Adjectival endings for colour. Comparatives and superlatives. Negatives: nada, nadie, ni… ni…, ningún, nunca, tampoco. Imperfect and present tenses for comparing then and now. Verbs with an infinitive. Applying pronunciation patterns. Speaking more expressively by using exclamations: ¡Qué va!, ¡Qué horror! Using the near future tense to say what you are going to do. Forming questions using: ¿Cuándo? ¿Qué? ¿Cómo? ¿A qué hora? ¿Dónde? Desde hace + present tense. Direct object pronouns (lo / la / los / las)

Understanding time expressions: past, present, future.

Module 3: Mi gente. Theme: Identity and culture>

Talking about social networks. Extending responses by referring to others. Making arrangement. Improvising dialogues. Talking about reading preferences. Using a range of connectives. Describing people. Understanding more detailed descriptions. Talking about friends and family. Grammar: Para + infinitive. Using direct object pronouns to improve flow of writing. The present continuous tense. Understanding different forms of familiar verbs. Ser and estar. Negatives: no, nunca, ni… ni…, tampoco. Reflexive verbs for relationships. Using adjectives and adverbs.

Module 4: Intereses e influencias. Theme: Identity and culture.

Talking about what you usually do. Talking about sports.

Talking about what’s trending. Using the perfect tense.

Discussing different types of entertainment. Talking about who inspires you. Talking about dates. Grammar: soler + infinitive. Preterite tense verbs. Using the imperfect tense to say what you used to do: regular / irregular verbs (ser, ir, ver). Using ya no and todavía. The perfect tense (regular / irregular past participles). Using ya and todavía with the perfect. Acabar de + infinitive. Useful adjectives (algunos / ciertos / otros / muchos / demasiados / todos)

Using the near future and tener ganas de… . Using a range of past tenses.

Module 5: Ciudades. Theme: Local, national, international and global areas of interest.

Describing the features of a region. Planning what to do. Understanding the geography of Spain. Shopping for clothes and presents. Talking about problems in a town. Describing a visit in the past. Grammar: se puede / se pueden + infinitive.

The future tense. Si + present, + future. The conditional

Irregular verbs in the conditional, so…, so much…, so many…

Using different tenses together (present, imperfect, perfect, conditional). Understanding two meanings of me quedé.

Year 11

Viva GCSE Edexcel:

Module 5: Ciudades. Theme: Local, national, international and global areas of interest.

Describing the features of a region. Planning what to do. Understanding the geography of Spain. Shopping for clothes and presents. Talking about problems in a town. Describing a visit in the past. Grammar: se puede / se pueden + infinitive.

The future tense. Si + present, + future. The conditional

Irregular verbs in the conditional, so…, so much…, so many…

Using different tenses together (present, imperfect, perfect, conditional). Understanding two meanings of me quedé.

Module 6: De costumbre. Theme: Identity and culture.

Describing mealtimes. Talking about daily routine. Talking about illnesses and injuries. Asking for help at the pharmacy

Talking about typical foods. Comparing different festivals. Describing a special day. Ordering in a restaurant. Talking about a music festival. Grammar: Reflexive verbs. Using estar for temporary states and feelings. Expressions with tener. Using tengo dolor de and doler to say something hurts

The passive. Using the ‘they’ form of different verbs. Preterite tense of reflexive verbs. Absolute superlatives

Irregular verbs in the preterite tense (tener, poner, poder, venir, traer, decir). Using the preterite and imperfect correctly to talk about the past. Expressions followed by the infinitive (para, al, sin, antes de, después de…).

Module 7: ¡A currar! Theme: Current and future study and employment.

Talking about how you earn money. Talking about work experience. Talking about the importance of learning languages. Applying for a summer job. Discussing gap years

Using the 24-hour clock. Grammar:

Soler in the imperfect tense. Using verbs in different tenses (including infinitives) and persons of the verbs. Using the preterite (for completed actions) and the imperfect (for repeated actions / descriptions) in the past

Using alternatives to ‘and’ (no solo …, sino también; tanto … como ….). Using a variety of tenses (present, perfect, future and conditional). Present and present continuous. Saber and conocer. The perfect tense. The conditional. The imperfect subjunctive.

Module 8: Hacia un mundo major. Theme: : Local, national, international and global areas of interest.

Considering global issues. Talking about local actions.

Discussing healthy lifestyles. Talking about international sporting events. Talking about natural disasters. Grammar: using quiero, tengo la intención de, espero, pienso, voy a, me gustaría…), Cuando + present subjunctive, the present subjunctive, the pluperfect tense.

How will students be assessed?

 

Exam at end of year11.

4 skills – listening, speaking, reading and writing. Speaking assessed in April/May. Conducted by class teacher, recorded and marked by exam board. All papers marked externally. Each paper = 25%.

Differentiation

 

Differentiated course via textbook – higher and foundation.

Grammar content is differentiated for the two tiers.

SEN – access to KS3 textbook for revision and consolidation via online activelearn.

Resources

 

Textbook - Viva GCSE for Edexcel (Pearson) Higher / Foundation.

https://www.pearsonactivelearn.com

https://www.languagesonline.org.uk

https://www.doddlelearn.co.uk

https://www.memrise.com

https://www.duolingo.com

www.bbc.co.uk/languages

Business Studies

Subject

Business Studies

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board

AQA (9-1 Course)

Course Leader

 

Miss Baldwin

Course summary

The course covers a range of real-life business topics.

Students study the basic functions of a business, as well as looking at business ownership, reasons for starting a business and enterprise.

Students also look at factors that require businesses to have a dynamic nature, these include: technology, economic factors and legislation. The Human Resources unit enables students to understand how businesses are organised, how they recruit and train staff, as well as motivate them.

Customer service, quality and production are also studied as part of the course.  The important factors of marketing are also included; this covers, customers, market research and the marketing mix. Key elements of finance are studied – sources of finance, cash flow, and basic financial calculations. Students are also taught how to analyse the financial performance of a business.

What will students learn?

 

Year 9

Year 10

Year 11

  • Business in the Real World
  • Influences on Business
  • Human Resources
  • Business Operations
  • Marketing
  • Finance

How will students be assessed?

  • 2 x 1 hour 45 minute exams sat at the end of year 11
  • Each exam is worth 50% of the final grade
  • There is no coursework in this subject

 

Class assessments:

  • Mini-assessments on exam style questions
  • End of topic/unit testing

Differentiation

  • A range of question types are used – multiple choice, short and long answer questions.
  • Modelling and scaffolding work to support the answering of all questions.
  • More complex ‘command’ words used to extend depth and application of topics.

Resources

  • AQA GCSE (9-1) Business, Second Edition
  • New GCSE Business AQA Revision Guide - For the Grade 9-1 Course
  • BBC Bitesize – Business Studies
  • Business Bee
  • www.Tutor2u.co.uk 
  • www.businessed.co.uk.

Child Development

Subject

Child Development

Qualification

Cambridge Nationals Level 1/2

Exam Board

OCR

Course Leader

Miss G Spencer

Course summary

This qualification is for learners who wish to develop applied knowledge and practical skills in child development. It is designed with both practical and theoretical elements, which will prepare students for further qualifications in Child Care, Health and Social Care, Psychology, Sociology and Biology

What will students learn?

Year 9

 

In the first topic of study students will develop essential knowledge and understanding in child development, covering reproduction, parental responsibility, antenatal care, birth, postnatal checks, postnatal provision, and conditions for development, childhood illnesses and child safety.

 

Year 10

 

In the second topic of study, students will gain knowledge of the equipment needs of babies and young children and an understanding of the factors to be considered when choosing appropriate equipment to meet all of these needs. This topic will also cover nutrition and hygiene practices and students will be given the opportunity to investigate feeding solutions, comparing these to nutritional requirements and evaluating the outcomes.

 

Year 11

 

In the third topic of study, students will gain an understanding of the development norms from birth to five years and the stages and benefits of play. Students will gain knowledge of, and skills in, developing activities to observe development norms in children up to the age of five. This topic will include researching, planning and carrying out activities with a child and observing and evaluating these activities, as well as comparing the child to the expected development norms.

 

How will students be assessed?

 

Unit 1- knowledge divided into 5 sections ready for a 60% exam

Unit 2- Projects made up of 4 parts (20%)

Unit 3- project made up of 4 parts (20%)

 

Differentiation

 

 

Variety of tasks used to challenge and stretch all abilities.

Differentiated tasks used to develop knowledge and understanding. Use of model answers to demonstrate task expectations.

 

Resources

 

 

Child Development – Cambridge National level ½ - Miranda Walker

Computer Science

Subject

COMPUTER SCIENCE

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board

OCR

Course Leader

 

Course summary

COMPUTER SYSTEMS COMPONENT 1 • Study how processors work. • Investigate computer memory and storage. • Explore modern network layouts and how they function. • Build skills in the ever important realm of cyber security. • Investigate how types of software are used within computer systems. • Stretch wider comprehension of how computers and computing affect ethical, legal, cultural and environmental issues.

 

COMPUTATIONAL THINKING, ALGORITHMS AND PROGRAMMING COMPONENT 2 • Study fundamental algorithms in computer science. • Build a firm foundation in programming techniques. • Produce programs through diagrams. • Thoroughly test programs and make them resistant to misuse. • Explore Boolean algebra (AND, OR, NOT). • Understand how we store data within computers in binary form.

 

 

A PROGRAMMING PROJECT • Use new-found programming skills on an independent coding project by solving a real-world problem. • Students will spend 20 classroom hours engaging with the Programing Project.

 

 

What will students learn?

Year 9 content

Study fundamental algorithms in computer science. • Build a firm foundation in programming techniques. • Explore Boolean algebra (AND, OR, NOT).

Year 10 content

Study fundamental algorithms in computer science. • Build a firm foundation in programming techniques. Algorithms * • Programming techniques

 

Year 11 content

Computer systems • Systems Architecture • Memory • Storage • Wired and wireless networks • Network topologies, protocols and layers • System security • System software • Ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns

Algorithms * • Programming techniques • Producing robust programs • Computational logic • Translators and facilities of languages • Data representation

 

How will students be assessed?

Computer systems (01) 80 marks 1 hour and 30 minutes Written paper

 

Computational thinking, algorithms and programming (02) 80 marks 1 hour and 30 minutes Written paper

 

Programming Project • Programming techniques • Analysis • Design • Development • Testing and evaluation and conclusions

Differentiation

Showing pupils an end result allows them to target set and develop their own working criteria.

Resources

Teacher notes, Craig and Davies task, ZigZag education, OCR ppt.

 

Computer science OCR (9-1)   S.Robson and PM Heathcote  pg online

Learning Python PM Heathcote pg online

https://www.sololearn.com/Play/Python

English

Subject

English

Qualifications

GCSE English Language

GCSE English Literature

Exam Board

AQA (Year 9 and 10)

OCR (Year 11 2018/19 only)

Course Leader

J Fletcher

Course summary

AQA

OCR (2018/19 only)

What will students learn?

Year 9

Students begin the year with a contextually driven unit surrounding Literature of the 1920s, studying a varied range of text types including periodicals, poetry and novels.

 

Students will then develop their narrative writing with an explicit focus on effective pacing and structural features.

 

Students revisit their genre study of the Gothic; however, in Year 9 study will centre on villains, identifying and analysing archetypal villains such as the monster, the ghost and the threat from abroad.

 

Students will study Shakespeare’s tragedy, Macbeth, which is a named text on the AQA GCSE, analysing it in light of its context and genre.

 

A Marginalised Voices unit will afford curriculum time to writers and texts whose voices have been traditionally ignored, e.g. immigrant voices, gendered voices, disabled voices, and will include a range of text types. Students will produce their own speeches around some of the issues studied for their GCSE Spoken Language component.

 

Preparing them for the study of the AQA Poetry Cluster, students will analyse a range of poems from across time around the themes of life and death, allowing students to become familiar with unseen poetry and common techniques used.

Year 10

Students begin the year by studying 10 of the 15 poems around conflict and power in their AQA anthologies, dealing with Romantic poetry, war poetry, familial conflict and conflict between the state and its people.

 

Students hone their writing of narrative and descriptive writing and develop their ability to plan stories around a written or visual stimulus.

 

A study of a 20th century text will enable students to apply their analytical skills to a contextually important text; students will either study An Inspector Calls or Lord of the Flies.

 

Students will revisit poetry for the ‘unseen’ poetry element, analysing language and structural features around a range of given themes. Simultaneously, students will familiarise themselves with the Reading Language Paper One on fiction extracts.

 

Students will end the year by revisiting and developing their study of Macbeth. Simultaneously, they will familiarise themselves with the Reading Language Paper 2 on non-fiction extracts.

 

Year 11

Students on OCR begin the year revising both Paper 2 Literature and Paper 2 Language. This includes Macbeth and the set poems from their anthology for Literature, and analysing and producing their own fiction in the Language exam.

 

Students then revise and study materials for Paper 1 Literature and Language. Literature includes An Inspector Calls and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. For Language, students will analyse and produce non-fiction texts.

How will students be assessed?

Throughout Year 9, students will have three end of unit tests that are in the style of GCSE exams. In addition, students will undertake their GCSE Spoken Language assessment in the summer term.

 

In Year 10, students will have three mock exams.

 

When in Year 11 students will have two rounds of mock examinations: one round for Paper 2 Literature and Language and another for Paper 1 Literature and Language.

 

All students will receive quality formative feedback, from marking classwork, every two weeks. This feedback both celebrates student achievement and pinpoints targets for improvement which then informs teaching. Literacy is constantly addressed.

 

AQA:

English Literature is formally assessed by terminal exams in the summer of Year 11.

 

Paper 1: Shakespeare and the 19th Century Novel (40% of English Literature GCSE)

Section A – Macbeth

Section B – Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde or A Christmas Carol

 

Paper 2: Modern Texts and Poetry (60% of English Literature GCSE)

Section A – Lord of the Flies or An Inspector Calls

Section B – Poetry Anthology (Power and Conflict)

Section C – Unseen Poetry

 

 

English Language is formally assessed by terminal exams in the summer of Year 11.

Paper 1: Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing (50% of GCSE English Language)

Section A – Reading Literary Fiction

Section B – Narrative or descriptive Writing

 

Paper 2: Writers' Viewpoints and Perspectives 50% of English Language GCSE)

Section A – Reading Non-fiction and Literary Non-fiction

Section B – Writing to present a viewpoint

 

OCR:

English Literature is formally assessed by terminal exams in the summer of Year 11.

 

Paper 1 (50% of Literature GCSE):

Section A – Modern text (An Inspector Calls)

Section B – Nineteenth Century Novel (Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)

 

Paper 2 (50% of Literature GCSE):

Section A – Poetry Anthology and Unseen Poetry

Section B – Shakespeare (Macbeth)

 

English Language is formally assessed by terminal exams in the summer of Year 11.

 

Paper 1 (50% of Language GCSE):

Section A – Reading Non-fiction

Section B – Writing Non-fiction

 

Paper 2 (50% of Language GCSE):

Section A – Reading Fiction

Section B – Writing Fiction

Differentiation

Drop-in sessions are run after school every Thursday for KS4 students to receive extra support on their unit of current study. These take place in E7.

 

Throughout the year differentiated revision sessions (provided after school) will target grades 4-6 and 7+, with students signing up for sessions appropriate for the grade they aiming for.

 

Invention will run throughout the year to provide additional support for students who are attaining under their MEG.

 

Texts studied for GCSE are appropriately challenging and selected to maximise success for students.

Resources

Year 9:

Grade 9-1 GCSE English Macbeth – The Complete Play CGP

 

Year 10:

Macbeth York Notes for GCSE (9-1)

An Inspector Calls York Notes for GCSE (9-1) OR Lord of the Flies York Notes for GCSE (9-1)

CGP AQA Anthology of Poetry: Power and Conflict for GCSE (9-1)

 

Year 11:

Macbeth York Notes for GCSE (9-1)

An Inspector Calls York Notes for GCSE (9-1)

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde York Notes for GCSE (9-1)

 

Links for grammar and text revision are set via Edulink, Doddle and PiXL Lit App.

Film Studies

Subject

Film Studies

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board

WJEC/EDUQAS

Course Leader

Lisa Barker

Course summary

Students learn about film narrative, aesthetics, representation and social context through analysing 6 films ranging from the 50s to contemporary global cinema. During the course they acquire film knowledge and terminology which they must utilise in producing their own screenplay and shooting script. A love of film is essential for this course.

What will students learn?

Year 9

Introduction to genre and micro-elements of film

Study of Skyfall in preparation for GCSE texts

Introduction to screenwriting

Study of Contemporary British Film Component 02– Attack the Block

Year 10

Completion of Component 02 film study – Attack the Block/ Slumdog Millionaire/Tsotsi

Non-exam assessment (NEA) Write an original screenplay/shooting script/evaluation

 

Year 11

Component 01 The history of film and film techniques

Comparative study of Rear Window and Witness

Independent film and critical writing – Little Miss Sunshine

How will students be assessed?

Component 01 one and a half hour exam    35% of total GCSE

Component 02 one and a half hour exam    35% of total GCSE

NEA-Screenwriting                                            30% of total GCSE

 

Continual exam practice during each element of the course.  End of Year 10 exam on Component 02

 

Differentiation

Lesson objectives are differentiated in class so that all abilities needs are met.

Resources

WJEC Eduqas GCSE Film Studies published by Illuminating Publishing

www.wjec.co.uk

eduqas.co.uk

Mathematics

Subject

Mathematics

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board

Edexcel Mathematics (9-1)

Course Leader

Mrs C Dye

Course summary

Our GCSE curriculum builds on the knowledge and skills learned in year 7 & 8 and is designed to develop an understanding of mathematical methods and concepts.  Students will be able to select and apply mathematical techniques to solve problems, make deductions and draw conclusions.  They will develop the ability to reason and communicate mathematically, and to be able to comprehend and interpret mathematical information in a variety

of forms and context.

What will students learn?

Year 9

Coordinates

Linear graphs

Proportion

Scales and standard form

Sequences

Expanding and factorising

Changing the subject of a formula

Linear equations and inequalities

Constructions

Congruence and similarity

Triangles and quadrilaterals

Angles in polygons

Simultaneous equations

Quadratic and other graphs

Probability

Pythagoras’ theorem and trigonometry

Simple proof

Mean from grouped data

Comparing distributions

Scattergraphs

 

Year 10

Consolidation

Calculating with fractions

Working with fractions, decimals, percentages

Reviewing indices and roots

Ratio and proportion

Transformations

Pythagoras in 2D

Fundamentals of algebra

Angles and shapes

Units & decimals

Area & perimeter

Properties of shape

Constructions & congruence

Fundamentals of probability

Fundamentals of algebra

Real life graphs

Core

Indices and standard from

Geometric change

Sequences

Enlargement and similarity

Bearings and trigonometry

Algebraic reasoning

Geometric reasoning

Vectors

Working with 3D shapes

Calculations with 3D shapes

Geometric reasoning

Sampling

Theoretical & experimental probability

Combined events

Quadratics

Non-linear graphs

Simultaneous equations

Extension

Further number

Recurrence relations

Further sequences

Further transformations

Triangles from 3D

Trigonometric graphs

Proof

Further inequalities

Upper & lower bounds

Similar areas & volume

Trigonometry in all triangles

Conditional probability

Further quadratics

Exponential graphs

Algebraic fractions

Year 11

Consolidation

Fundamentals of algebra

Ratio & proportion

Direct & inverse proportion

Fundamentals of statistics

Applying mathematics

Core

Circles

Variation

Proof

Representing data

Correlation & best fit

Compound & other measures

Extension

Circle theorems

Circle geometry

Variation with powers

Further statistics

Functions

Further graphs

 

 

How will students be assessed?

As we work through the curriculum, students understanding will be assessed regularly in class using the ‘next steps’ process, where guidance is given on what needs to be done to progress. 

In year 9 & 10 there will be three formal assessments throughout the year, each covering all topics taught so far. 

In year 11, mock exams will take place in November and February.

Differentiation

A core curriculum is taught to all Year 9 students, with ‘scaffolding’ in place for lower ability groups and higher ability sets being given extension tasks.  In year 10 and 11 all students follow a core curriculum, with consolidation in place for lower ability sets and extension (essentially higher tier) topics for high ability students.  Mathematical reasoning is embedded in the curriculum at all levels.

Resources

https://hegartymaths.com/

https://corbettmaths.com/

PiXL maths app

Music

Subject

Music

Qualification

GCSE Music

BTEC Music in Practise

Exam Board

GCSE- OCR

BTEC- EDEXCEL/Pearson

Course Leader

Mr C Berthon

Course summary

Both courses develop you as a composer, performer and listener. In addition, the BTEC develops your production skills using music technology. You track your development as a performer and will make recordings to show your progress. You will compose in a wide range of styles both for your main instrument and for specific purposes such as film music. The course will widen your musical experience by introducing you to many styles from around the world such as Indian classical, Greek and Brazilian samba. We also examine the western tradition of classical music and see how this has influenced film and video games music. We draw on your knowledge of pop music and look at the many sub-genres and styles from both the present and the past.

 

Year 9

In Yr 9 we build skills from Yr 7 and 8 which will lead to success in GCSE and BTEC. This means developing your skills as a performer on an instrument/vocals and learning to refine these as part of an ensemble. You will learn how to read music in a variety of traditional notations and understand how notes are represented as MIDI data in music software. We build on your experiences as a composer and do many short compositions in different styles looking at techniques such as developing chord sequences, riffs and varying textures and timbres. You will listen to a wide variety of music and have an overview of all the styles that you will tackle in more depth later in the course.

Year 10

You build on the work done in Yr 9 by developing your performing skills to a higher level and with an even greater degree of fluency and expression. As a composer, BTEC students will keep a log of the work they do and build up a series of videos to show their progress. GCSE students will compose their first composition, probably for their main instrument. In listening, we will examine some of the styles in greater depth which in turn will feed into your composition and production work. Students will learn specific skills such as dictation which are useful for all musicians and will be tested as part of the GCSE listening exam. BTEC students may choose to have a particular focus on music technology and develop their production skills in Ableton Live software.

 

Year 11

In Yr 11 all students will continue to deepen and develop their musical skills. GCSE students will record final performances, some as part of a group, and compose a second composition to a brief given by the exam board. BTEC students will continue to build and log evidence of their progress as performers, composers and in production skills. They will undertake a task to a brief set by the board which will focus on one of these areas. GCSE students will sit a listening exam in May/June for which they will prepare by re-visiting all the musical styles and learning specific exam techniques.

 

How will students be assessed?

GCSE students submit recordings of their performances and compositions which constitute 60% of their total mark. The listening exam is 40%.

BTEC students build a portfolio of their work as performers and composers and undertake a task set by the exam board. There is no final written exam.

Differentiation

At all stages of the course there is differentiation that takes into account the different musical experiences of students. For example, very experienced instrumentalists will want to tackle complex and demanding pieces of music while less experienced instrumentalists need to build their skills with less complex material. Those with prior experience in music technology will employ more advanced production techniques while others learn how to use the software in less complex ways.

Resources

Music software: Ableton Live 10 is used in class and can be purchased from Ableton’s website in a variety of editions (we use the Standard edition). It can be trialled for 30 days free. There are excellent tutorial videos on the Ableton website.

Music notation: Noteflight.com

Music terminology:Memrise.com

Ear training: Theta music trainer https://trainer.thetamusic.com/en/node

GCSE revision books for the OCR Music specification are produced by GTP and Rhinegold Publishing.

The music department has a YouTube channel for which we produce revision videos (WVC Music).

Physical Education

Subject

Physical Education

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board

OCR

Course Leader

Mr Pettifor

Course summary

This course is for students with particular interest and ability in physical activity which covers a three year programme. GCSE Physical Education will stimulate and enthuse students who have a keen interest in health and fitness. It will promote a love of learning of the anatomical and physiological demands of physical activity, whilst examining new areas such as sport psychology, biomechanical processes and socio-cultural influences.

 

The practical element, which is worth 40% of the course, is assessed in three different sports as a performer. These three performances must include one individual and one team performance, the third is from either category. There is a specific list of sports examination board. This aspect of the course will also consist of a written assessment task, through analysing a performance and suggesting corrective measures to aid improvement.

What will students learn?

Year 9

Unit 1.2 – Physical Training

  • Components of Fitness – Understand definitions, apply practical examples, perform suitable tests and collate data.
  • Training Principles – Understand the definitions and apply them to a personal exercise programme.
  • Optimising Training – Understand the FITT principle and apply these to a personal exercise programme. Know the key components and benefits of a warm up/cool down.
  • Prevention of Injury – Understand how the risk of injury can be minimised in physical activity, and identifying potential hazards in a range of sport settings.

 

Unit 2.3 – Health, fitness and well-being

  • Physical, social & emotional benefits of physical activity and consequences of a sedentary lifestyle – Understand what is meant by health, fitness and well-being and the issues surrounding a sedentary lifestyle. Know and collate specific data surrounding various age groups and understand common occurring themes.
  • Diet and nutrition – Understand the components of a balanced diet and apply to a practical example. Students will also be able to understand the importance of hydration on performance.

Year 10

Unit 2.1 – Engagement patterns of different social groups

  • Physical activity and sport in the UK – Research and understand the current participation trends in sport.
  • Participation in Sport – Understand the different factors that influence the participation in various sports and be able to apply current examples.
  • Commercialisation – Understand the influence of media on sports participation and apply current sporting examples.
  • Ethics in Sport – Understand the values surrounding sportsmanship and the reasons behind deviance within sport. Students will also be able to apply examples to these concepts.
  • Drugs in Sport – Students will be able to understand the types of drugs used in sport, the effects/impacts on performance and the reasons why they are used, providing practical examples.
  • Violence in Sport – Students will be able to know the reasons for player violence and provide examples within case studies.

 

Unit 2.2 – Sports Psychology

  • Characteristics of Skilful Movement – Understand and apply examples of the characteristics of skilful movement in various sport disciplines.
  • Classification of skills – Understand the difficulty and environmental continuum’s and apply practical examples with justifications.
  • Goal Setting – Understand the SMART principle with practical examples to optimise performance.
  • Mental Preparation – Know and apply mental preparation techniques surrounding Imagery, Mental Rehearsal, Selective Attention & Positive Thinking.
  • Types of guidance and feedback – Understand the types of guidance and feedback, the advantages and disadvantages of both and apply practical examples.

Year 11

Unit 1.1 – The Structure & Function of the Skeletal System

  • Location of major bones – Know the name and location of a series of bones in the body
  • Functions of the skeleton – Understand the importance of the skeleton using sporting examples.
  • Types of synovial joint – Know the definition and the location of the synovial joints in the body.
  • Types of movement – Understand the types of movement at the joints and apply sporting examples.
  • Components of joints – Understand the roles of the joints.
  • Location of major muscle groups – Know and understand the locations of the following muscle groups.
  • Roles of muscles in movement – Understand the roles of muscles during movements and apply them to sporting examples.
  • Lever systems – Understand the types of levers and their uses within sports.
  • Planes and axes of movement – Understand and apply the location of the planes of movement in the body and axes of rotation in a sporting context.
  • Cardiovascular system – Know and understand the structure and functions of the cardiovascular system.
  • Respiratory system - Know and understand the structure and functions of the respiratory system.
  • Aerobic & anaerobic exercise - Know and understand the difference between aerobic and anaerobic exercise.
  • Short & long term effects of exercise – Understand both the short and long term effects of exercise and apply to a sporting example using data.

How will students be assessed?

Practical

NEA (Non-exam assessment): Practical performance in three different physical activities in the role of player/performer (one in a team activity, one in an individual activity and a third in either a team or in an individual activity). Analysis and evaluation of performance to bring about improvement in one activity.  The NEA is worth 40% of the total marks. 

 

Theory

  • Paper 1: Unit 1 - 1 hour 15-minute written examination worth 30% of the total marks. 
  • Paper 2: Unit 2 - 1 hour 15-minute written examination worth 30% of the total marks 

Differentiation

During lessons, there will be tasks to challenge all students. Support will be given both during lessons and during our PE Catch-Up sessions. To enable all students to push towards their capabilities, progressive activities will be set in order to stretch the knowledge of all.

Resources

Textbook: OCR PE for GCSE

Websites:

  1. https://www.bbc.com/bitesize/examspecs/ztrcg82
  2. https://revisionworld.com/gcse-revision/pe-physical-education/ocr-gcse-physical-education-pe

Religious Studies

Subject

Religious Studies

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board

OCR

Course Leader

Mrs Watts

Course summary

The aim of the GCSE RS course is to enable students to have knowledge, understanding of both the Beliefs and Teachings and the Practices of two World Religions: Christianity and Islam. It also requires students to have knowledge and understanding of Ethical and Philosophical teachings around Relationships and Families, Religion, Peace and Conflict, The existence of God and Dialogue between religious and non-religious beliefs and attitudes.

What will students learn?

Year 9

Students will complete Christianity Beliefs and Teachings and Islam Beliefs and Teachings as well as study aspects of the Ethical and Philosophical topics of Relationships and Families and The existence of God.

Year 10

Students will complete Relationships and Families and The existence of God, as well as Christian Practices and Religion, Peace and Conflict modules.

Year 11

Students will complete Islam Practices and Dialogue between religious and non-religious beliefs and attitudes modules.

How will students be assessed?

Exam Assessment: The course is 100% exam based. Students will take three exams; 1hr Christianity Beliefs, Teachings and Practices Paper, 1hr Islam Beliefs, Teachings and Practices Paper, 2hr Christianity based Ethics and Philosophy Paper.

 

In class assessment: Students are assessed Formatively every four to eight hours of learning with a low stakes retrieval and interleaved multiple-choice quiz and keyword definitions. This assessment also includes one style of exam style question(s) which is feedback on in-line with the College Marking Policy.

At the end of each module students will have a Summative Assessment on the topic just completed.

Students will also be assessed through Mock Exams in Year 9, Year 10 and Year 11.

Differentiation

All lessons include stretch tasks and extensions for the more able/ Higher Ability Students.

Tasks are scaffolded and modelled for all students to ensure all can attain their best in class.

Resources

RE Definitions App

Core Textbook: OCR GCSE (9-1) Religious Studies by Lorraine Abbott ISBN: 978-1-471-86524-4

Core Revision Guide: My Revision Notes OCR GCSE (9-1) Religious Studies ISBN: 978-1-510-40976-7 (Purchasable through Mrs Watts with discount).